My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic “Every Little Thing She Does” Review

My Little Pony returns with an episode bringing back the season’s semi-main focus: Twilight training Starlight Glimmer in the ways of friendship. This character arc has been pretty good, even though redeeming Starlight in the first place was a questionable decision. “Every Little Thing She Does” isn’t a fantastic episode nor a particularly mediocre one either.

Starlight Glimmer is excelling at her magical studies with Twilight Sparkle, but she has been avoiding her friendship lessons. Feeling pressure to impress her teacher, Starlight attempts to tackle several friendship problems at once.

The episode begins with Twilight in a magic training session with Starlight. This was a fun sequence because we got to see the two in a kind of sparring practice. The main story starts when Starlight sets out to complete all of her friendship lessons at once. Based on the description it seemed like the plot would have Starlight go around Ponyville attempting to complete these friendship quests somehow at once. Instead of going that route however, the writing went in another direction. Sadly, this is where the episode falters.

The story wants us to accept that Starlight is totally okay with using spells to cheat her way out of completing the lessons. It can argued that she didn’t mean to mind-control the ponies, but once she saw what the spell had done, she decided to keep going. Yes, it’s shown she has grown desperate to complete the lessons, but she nonetheless appeared unreasonable throughout the middle act.

The message at the end is the best part and makes the episode slightly above average. Starlight states she’s afraid to do projects with each of the Mane 6 because she’s worried she might not be good at them. Twilight tells her that it’s not about the project; it’s about getting to know the person (pony) more. It’s about the company. This is especially true in real life. If for example I asked my hypothetical future wife to play a game of Super Smash Bros. with me, I wouldn’t be asking because she’d give me a challenge. (This is assuming of course that she wouldn’t be into the game.) I would ask simply because I like her company. We sometimes do things we’re not into/good at for the other person, whether it be to get to know him/her better, out of love, or simply for the company.

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Overall, “Every Little Thing She Does” is a standard episode made better by the excellent delivery of the message at the end. With a better middle act, we could have had one of the best of the show.

7/10

 

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My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic “Stranger than Fan Fiction” Review

After a few months hiatus, My Little Pony returns for its second half of Season 6. By now there’s no need to discuss things generally speaking. If you’ve been following my reviews, then you know I consider Season 6 to be the weakest season so far. This doesn’t equate to bad of course, because the show is still leagues ahead of what is currently on television. It’s just when compared to the early seasons the episodes here have been of lesser quality. Today’s episode isn’t an immensely notable one. It is by no means terrible, or even a bad watch, just more on the average side.

Rainbow Dash attends the Daring Do Convention in Manehattan and meets a pony who hates Daring Do as much as she loves it.

Written by Josh Haber and Michael Vogel

This episode has two main parts, the first being at the convention and the next being the Daring Do adventure. First, the convention scenes were very well done. It’s accurate to how a real life pony, or any kind of pop culture event would be. We can see the genuine excitement on Rainbow Dash’s face throughout these parts. Perhaps the best scene is when she runs into another hardcore fan like herself, by the name of Quibble Pants. Again, this is accurate to a real life convention. When you meet someone whom has a heavy interest in a specific area, whether it be pony, Trek, or Japanese monsters there’s a cool little connection as two discuss things only true fans can talk about. These early scenes were fun. Sadly, the writing takes a dip in quality during the second act.

I applaud the show for talking about a great lesson, and that’s on the subject of opinions. Rainbow Dash thinks all the Daring Do books are excellent, especially the latter entries. Quibble on the the other hand can’t stand the latter ones, and refuses to acknowledge them. This leads to some heated discussion between the two characters. This doesn’t have to be a bad thing, because often a lesson is learned after a hardship. The problem is that Quibble starting from the opening argument becomes a very jarring character to listen to. The ironically annoying part is that he proves to be seemingly smarter than Daring Do herself, showing her how to do her job in the climax.

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The overall message is that it’s okay for fans to have differing opinions on their favorite subject. For example, many Star Trek fans seem to agree that Nemesis is one of the worst films in the series, but what if a person says it actually isn’t that bad? Another example might be a Godzilla fan claiming Final Wars to be actually pretty good when many consider it to be one of the worst in the series. Instead of fans attacking one another, they should discuss things in a happy manner. So, it’s definitely a good lesson. A lot of the dialogue in the second half from Quibble, which is the constant mocking of the situation before realizing he’s in real danger was cliche and fell flat. As for Rainbow Dash herself, she wasn’t bad. The only hard-to-believe scene is that she would go out of her way and talk to Daring Do to get the latter to convince Quibble that all the books are good.

Overall, “Stranger than Fan Fiction” isn’t a 5 star episode, but still an okay watch. The message is something any fan of pop culture can understand and appreciate. The dynamic between Rainbow Dash and Quibble was good in the beginning, & in the final few minutes. In-between is where most of the negatives are. The viewers have to deal with the annoying dialogue from Quibble when they want to see more of Daring Do since she has been absent from the show for quite awhile.

6.5/10

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic “Spice Up Your Life” Review

Today’s episode of MLP is a bit on the sad side. It’s not because it’s extra emotional, but that it marks the final one until later in the year. Mid-season breaks are always disappointing, but good in a way as well. (The wait between seasons are shortened.) So today is a farewell installment for now. Interestingly, the story brings back the Friendship Map, which hasn’t been seen since the Season 5 finale.  This time, the Brave and the Bold duo is Rarity and Pinkie Pie. Michael Vogel wrote the superb “A Hearth’s Warming Tail,” so “Spice Up Your Life” was in good hands. This episode was definitely a much better one than what we’ve seen these last few weeks.

Here’s the official description from Discovery Family:

Pinkie Pie and Rarity are called to Canterlot by the map to solve a friendship problem. They discover a father and daughter whose relationship is strained as they struggle to keep their restaurant open.

What’s interesting about the Friendship Map is that it picks two ponies for a specific job. It’s not random; rather it picks them knowing their specific traits will be the best way to help fix a problem. Rarity and Pinkie Pie have never really had the focus on them together, (besides “The Gift of the Maud Pie,” though Maud took away from that focus) so that alone is enough to be extra interested in “Spice.” The two play off each other well throughout. Rarity is more fancy, looking for 3 star review restaurants, while Pinkie doesn’t care about stuff like that and just wants to eat good food, even if the place has no reviews. Vogel has a solid handle on their personalities. The action gets really interesting when they journey into a restaurant on the verge of closing down since there’s no customers. (Sort of reminds me of Babu’s predicament in his debut episode in Seinfeld.)

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The last few seasons have done a solid job at introducing fun new side characters. It’s particularly pleasing to hear such an amount of attention to the voice acting, something MLP has always excelled in. Saffron Masala was a fun character to have around. The writing does a solid job showing the intense emotion she has because of the disagreement on the restaurant business with her father, Corlander Cumin. He wasn’t quite as fun, but it’s easy to see what the episode was aiming for: showing a disgruntled store owner. For the most part the story succeeds at doing that. What it falls short in however is the character of Zesty Gourmand. Again, it’s easy to see what the writing was going for: a reviewing snob whom thinks her word is law. She was however just a little too exaggerated to take seriously.

Perhaps the most interesting part was how the disagreement between Rarity and Pinkie came about. People have different opinions on how things should be done. In the episode’s context, Rarity believes that in order for the restaurant to get a good review it should try to mimic the ones which have the full three stars. Pinkie on the other hand believes the opposite: the restaurant needs its own unique flavor. The argument between the two was fun to watch. The resolution seemed pretty fast, but also shows that the two friends can move past a dispute and get back to the issue at hand pretty quickly. The song was fun, though it seems the budget may have ran out since it reuses the same scene three times over.

Overall, “Spice Up Your Life” was a fun team up adventure. At its core, it’s about Pinkie and Rarity helping out a struggling family business. There’s nothing particularity negative about it, other than Zesty. The other new characters, especially Saffron, are good. It’s not a masterpiece, but still a nice watch on a Saturday afternoon. These duo episodes are some of the most entertaining in MLP.

8/10