Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run Review

looney tunes rabbits run

Ever heard of this movie? No? Well, you’ve come to the right place. Released in 2015, Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run was a straight-to-DVD film in the Looney Tunes series. In fact, it was the first Looney production in nine years, following Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas. (That was a decent, fun take on A Christmas Carol.) Rabbits Run is particularly interesting, as it was based on The Looney Tunes Show, which ran from 2011 to 2014. The show had two seasons, with 52 episodes altogether. The show was controversial in that it abandoned the slapstick comedy the classic shorts were known for in favor of a sitcom format. While different than the iconic shorts, The Looney Tunes Show was nonetheless an incredibly written comedy. At its best, it was on par with Seinfeld. (If you need to be convinced, check out ‘Rebel Without a Glove‘ or ‘Gribbler’s Quest.’)

This brings us to Rabbits Run, a film that pretty much fell under the radar upon release. It was done by many of the same people who worked on The Looney Tunes Show, and has an identical animation style. Like the show, it is more dialogue based than the original shorts. I had originally seen this film a few months after release, and found it to be mediocre. After re-watching most of The Looney Tunes Show, I thought it would be good to revisit this movie and see if it was the mediocre viewing I remembered. Sometimes if you haven’t seen a film in awhile, you walk away with a new opinion of it, whether good or bad. Upon my revisit of Rabbits Run, I was quite impressed. The writing is very good, and features a lot of what made The Looney Tunes Show a modern classic. The film is not perfect, but it’s a great watch for any Looney Tunes fan, or those wanting to watch a quality comedy.

Interestingly, although animated in the same style as The Looney Tunes Show, Rabbits Run is in its own continuity. So, the story begins at a government base, led by Foghorn Leghorn. On the screen, they have finally found it: a rare, special flower. Before their ship can acquire it, the flower mysteriously disappears, or rather, is taken extremely quickly by a small figure. Meanwhile, Lola Bunny is a perfume salesperson, but has aspirations of creating her own fragrance. After being fired for breaking into song about her dreams and inadvertently breaking the shop, she heads out and eventually jumps into a taxi. The driver? Bugs Bunny, who wasn’t expecting the adventure that is about to unfold…

Lola and Bugs

 

When Space Jam released in 1996, it introduced a new character to the Looney Tunes mythos: Lola Bunny. She was okay, but little more than a love interest for Bugs Bunny. That changed in The Looney Tunes Show, where her character was revamped. Instead of just being a love interest, she was given an interesting personality. She was caring and indecisive. She was extroverted, and kinda crazy in her thinking. In short, she was a fun character, and that is carried over perfectly into Rabbits Run. In an early sequence, she accidentally gives wrong directions to taxi driver Bugs. Instead of her current apartment, she led him to where she used to live, where she used to be a boat captain…but she’s not sure if she was a seven year captain in real life, or in her dreams. In another scene, she explains to Bugs the reason why she knows the sewers so well:

Lola: “So, every day on my way to work, I would stop at the same hot dog vendor and get a hot dog. But then one day I read on the Internet, 10 unsurprising foods no one should be eating and hot dogs were number one. Well, obviously, I couldn’t keep eating hot dogs, but I still had to walk past the hot dog vendor to get to work. I just couldn’t face him.
His sad little hot-dog-vendor face. But that was the only way to get to work or so I thought.”

It’s comedic writing like this that makes this movie such a fun watch. Regarding Bugs, he’s also very good. He’s shocked by how crazy Lola is, and is forced into helping her escape from Elmer Fudd and Cecil the Turtle. Bugs grows fond of Lola, despite her zaniness. In The Looney Tunes Show, Bugs is constantly annoyed by Lola’s antics, yet can’t help but love her anyway. (In the episode, ‘Dear John,‘ there’s a big misunderstanding where he thinks she broke up with him, so he travels the oceans away from civilization in sadness.) In Rabbits Run, the two are extremely enjoyable to watch. In the end, Bugs abandons his dreams of wanting to be left alone, because he has found the bunny for him.

daffy bugs lola

 

Of course, it wouldn’t be a Looney Tunes adventure without Daffy Duck. Daffy was the major reason The Looney Tunes Show was so good. As the “Kramer” of the show, he sometimes found himself in crazy situations, such as going from a muffin man to CEO in the course of a day, and thinking the marine corps is the same as marine biology. Sadly, Daffy’s role isn’t that big in Rabbits Run. Still, his sequences are fantastic. As a taxi driver (yes, he drives a taxi too), he thinks he’s getting paid by salary, and gets to drive himself around, not give people rides. Later, he notices that ducks get to live in the zoo for free, and get fed, for free. “Interesting,” he says. It’s a shame that Daffy was only seen for a small part in the movie, but his scenes with Bugs, and later Lola, were comedy gold.

There’s a great, secret story at work within the actual story. Cecil was seemingly working for the US military, but in actuality, he was a double agent for Marvin the Martian. Cecil was a fun character in this movie. One of the best scenes was when he was told on the phone to eliminate Lola. He says that he didn’t know he would be eliminating anyone, but “that’s fine.” He says it so causally that the viewer can’t help but burst out laughing. The voice acting is excellent in this movie, and particular praise has to be given to Jim Rash for his portrayal of Cecil.

Marketing made a mistake putting Marvin in the trailer for Rabbits Run. His appearance in the film is treated as a plot twist. Despite knowing Marvin is involved in the story, his sudden appearance is nonetheless excellent. His line, “If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself,” was brilliantly delivered. (The background music that plays during Marvin’s scenes is fantastic.) It’s a shame the climax decided to be more on the slapstick side, wasting what could have been a climatic battle against Marvin.

That’s the only fault of the movie: the slapstick doesn’t work. See, The Looney Tunes Show was built as a sitcom, not as seven minute shorts. When there was slapstick in the show, it felt out of place and too goofy. It’s the same in Rabbits Run; any slapstick is out of place and unneeded. Because of that, the climax was ultimately disappointing. Still, there aren’t that many slapstick scenes, and what is there doesn’t ruin the experience.

Marvin

Overall, Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run is a very entertaining movie. The writing is on point, the comedy is usually great, and the character interactions are fun. Like The Looney Tunes Show, it has an emphasis on dialogue that both kids and adults can enjoy. Seriously, go check out The Looney Tunes Show, and then Rabbits Run. These are probably the last Looney Tunes media to use this particular style, and they deserve to be watched.

8/10

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2 thoughts on “Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run Review

  1. thecoolkat1995 says:

    I’m glad to see “The Looney Tunes Show” getting more appreciation on the internet these days. It was bashed a lot during it’s run, but I always thought it was a pretty clever show (“Off-Duty Cop” was my favorite episode, if only because we briefly saw Bugs Bunny turn into a drug addict). I’ll be sure to watch “Rabbit’s Run” someday.

    Liked by 1 person

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