Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run Review

looney tunes rabbits run

Ever heard of this movie? No? Well, you’ve come to the right place. Released in 2015, Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run was a straight-to-DVD film in the Looney Tunes series. In fact, it was the first Looney production in nine years, following Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas. (That was a decent, fun take on A Christmas Carol.) Rabbits Run is particularly interesting, as it was based on The Looney Tunes Show, which ran from 2011 to 2014. The show had two seasons, with 52 episodes altogether. The show was controversial in that it abandoned the slapstick comedy the classic shorts were known for in favor of a sitcom format. While different than the iconic shorts, The Looney Tunes Show was nonetheless an incredibly written comedy. At its best, it was on par with Seinfeld. (If you need to be convinced, check out ‘Rebel Without a Glove‘ or ‘Gribbler’s Quest.’)

This brings us to Rabbits Run, a film that pretty much fell under the radar upon release. It was done by many of the same people who worked on The Looney Tunes Show, and has an identical animation style. Like the show, it is more dialogue based than the original shorts. I had originally seen this film a few months after release, and found it to be mediocre. After re-watching most of The Looney Tunes Show, I thought it would be good to revisit this movie and see if it was the mediocre viewing I remembered. Sometimes if you haven’t seen a film in awhile, you walk away with a new opinion of it, whether good or bad. Upon my revisit of Rabbits Run, I was quite impressed. The writing is very good, and features a lot of what made The Looney Tunes Show a modern classic. The film is not perfect, but it’s a great watch for any Looney Tunes fan, or those wanting to watch a quality comedy.

Interestingly, although animated in the same style as The Looney Tunes Show, Rabbits Run is in its own continuity. So, the story begins at a government base, led by Foghorn Leghorn. On the screen, they have finally found it: a rare, special flower. Before their ship can acquire it, the flower mysteriously disappears, or rather, is taken extremely quickly by a small figure. Meanwhile, Lola Bunny is a perfume salesperson, but has aspirations of creating her own fragrance. After being fired for breaking into song about her dreams and inadvertently breaking the shop, she heads out and eventually jumps into a taxi. The driver? Bugs Bunny, who wasn’t expecting the adventure that is about to unfold…

Lola and Bugs

 

When Space Jam released in 1996, it introduced a new character to the Looney Tunes mythos: Lola Bunny. She was okay, but little more than a love interest for Bugs Bunny. That changed in The Looney Tunes Show, where her character was revamped. Instead of just being a love interest, she was given an interesting personality. She was caring and indecisive. She was extroverted, and kinda crazy in her thinking. In short, she was a fun character, and that is carried over perfectly into Rabbits Run. In an early sequence, she accidentally gives wrong directions to taxi driver Bugs. Instead of her current apartment, she led him to where she used to live, where she used to be a boat captain…but she’s not sure if she was a seven year captain in real life, or in her dreams. In another scene, she explains to Bugs the reason why she knows the sewers so well:

Lola: “So, every day on my way to work, I would stop at the same hot dog vendor and get a hot dog. But then one day I read on the Internet, 10 unsurprising foods no one should be eating and hot dogs were number one. Well, obviously, I couldn’t keep eating hot dogs, but I still had to walk past the hot dog vendor to get to work. I just couldn’t face him.
His sad little hot-dog-vendor face. But that was the only way to get to work or so I thought.”

It’s comedic writing like this that makes this movie such a fun watch. Regarding Bugs, he’s also very good. He’s shocked by how crazy Lola is, and is forced into helping her escape from Elmer Fudd and Cecil the Turtle. Bugs grows fond of Lola, despite her zaniness. In The Looney Tunes Show, Bugs is constantly annoyed by Lola’s antics, yet can’t help but love her anyway. (In the episode, ‘Dear John,‘ there’s a big misunderstanding where he thinks she broke up with him, so he travels the oceans away from civilization in sadness.) In Rabbits Run, the two are extremely enjoyable to watch. In the end, Bugs abandons his dreams of wanting to be left alone, because he has found the bunny for him.

daffy bugs lola

 

Of course, it wouldn’t be a Looney Tunes adventure without Daffy Duck. Daffy was the major reason The Looney Tunes Show was so good. As the “Kramer” of the show, he sometimes found himself in crazy situations, such as going from a muffin man to CEO in the course of a day, and thinking the marine corps is the same as marine biology. Sadly, Daffy’s role isn’t that big in Rabbits Run. Still, his sequences are fantastic. As a taxi driver (yes, he drives a taxi too), he thinks he’s getting paid by salary, and gets to drive himself around, not give people rides. Later, he notices that ducks get to live in the zoo for free, and get fed, for free. “Interesting,” he says. It’s a shame that Daffy was only seen for a small part in the movie, but his scenes with Bugs, and later Lola, were comedy gold.

There’s a great, secret story at work within the actual story. Cecil was seemingly working for the US military, but in actuality, he was a double agent for Marvin the Martian. Cecil was a fun character in this movie. One of the best scenes was when he was told on the phone to eliminate Lola. He says that he didn’t know he would be eliminating anyone, but “that’s fine.” He says it so causally that the viewer can’t help but burst out laughing. The voice acting is excellent in this movie, and particular praise has to be given to Jim Rash for his portrayal of Cecil.

Marketing made a mistake putting Marvin in the trailer for Rabbits Run. His appearance in the film is treated as a plot twist. Despite knowing Marvin is involved in the story, his sudden appearance is nonetheless excellent. His line, “If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself,” was brilliantly delivered. (The background music that plays during Marvin’s scenes is fantastic.) It’s a shame the climax decided to be more on the slapstick side, wasting what could have been a climatic battle against Marvin.

That’s the only fault of the movie: the slapstick doesn’t work. See, The Looney Tunes Show was built as a sitcom, not as seven minute shorts. When there was slapstick in the show, it felt out of place and too goofy. It’s the same in Rabbits Run; any slapstick is out of place and unneeded. Because of that, the climax was ultimately disappointing. Still, there aren’t that many slapstick scenes, and what is there doesn’t ruin the experience.

Marvin

Overall, Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run is a very entertaining movie. The writing is on point, the comedy is usually great, and the character interactions are fun. Like The Looney Tunes Show, it has an emphasis on dialogue that both kids and adults can enjoy. Seriously, go check out The Looney Tunes Show, and then Rabbits Run. These are probably the last Looney Tunes media to use this particular style, and they deserve to be watched.

8/10

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Revisiting Batman Begins

Batman-Begins

Batman is one of the most iconic figures in popular culture. He first appeared in 1939, making him one of the earliest comic book characters. He has starred in numerous other media – from the campy, but beloved Adam West 1966 series, to 2017’s Justice League film. At this point, Batman may be the most popular comic book character. People always look forward to films with him in it. In 1989, Director Tim Burton gave Batman a new film for the big screen, which was arguably the turning point in the general public’s perception of the character. Keep in mind that the general audience at that point knew Batman from the 66 series – something not to be taken seriously. That changed in Burton’s Batman. Burton delivered a serious story, with a good take on the Joker. But, things went wrong two films later.

Batman Forever introduced campy elements into what was a serious film series. Jim Carrey’s portrayal of the Riddler was a joke, and don’t get me started on Two-Face in that film. Next, Batman and Robin needs no introduction, but that is the film that killed Batman’s film career for awhile. I don’t personally hate Batman and Robin – I think it’s a superior film to Forever. But, it’s easy to see why Batman and Robin is despised. That film had ice puns, and a generally silly feel. It was in stark contrast to the 1989 film. From 1997 to 2005, there was no Batman film on the big screen.

In 2005, Batman Begins released to critical acclaim. Director Christopher Nolan has remained one of the most passionate of directors, and it shows in Begins. The quality of the writing, and directing, is evident throughout. This film isn’t perfect – it’s a little choppy during the beginning and Christian Bale is at times a mediocre Bruce Wayne. But, everything comes together so well for such a thrilling climax. Batman Begins remains a very important film, and an excellent start to a fantastic trilogy.

The film’s first act is interesting, as it shows Bruce Wayne in a foreign prison camp. We don’t know too much of who he is, or what’s going on. His history is told through flashbacks. Here, I need to make mention that Linus Roache did such a great job portraying Thomas Wayne. There are many notable quotes in this film, and one of the best was Thomas telling Bruce, “And why do we fall, Bruce? So we can learn to pick ourselves up.” Thomas was a man striving to do the right thing, someone a son could look up to. That’s why when Rachel later says, “Your father would be ashamed of you,” it hits home.

The opening act is a little choppy with its editing between present day and flashbacks. I think if the film had begun using all the flashback footage, and then cutting to Bruce at the prison camp, it would have been more effective. With that said, most of the film is excellent. Bruce’s training with Henri Ducard (who later reveals himself to be the true Ra’s al Ghul) was great, and Bruce’s assault on the temple was appropriately intense, as many scenes in this movie are.

ra's

Upon my latest viewing of this film, I realized just how great of a character Ra’s al Ghul was. Liam Neeson delivers a perfect portrayal, delivering someone whom is passionate about his ideals, yet not overly eccentric, but subdued. Neeson is always calm, delivering fantastic dialogue. When facing Batman on the train, Bruce has the villain at knife point with a batarang. Ra’s calmly says, “Have you finally learned to do what is necessary?” Ra’s commands every scene he’s in. One of the best scenes in the entire film is when he reveals himself to Bruce at the latter’s mansion. Dialogue is brilliantly said again: “If someone stands in the way of true justice, you simply walk up behind them… and stab them in the heart.” It’s a shame that Neeson’s portrayal of Ra’s al Ghul isn’t that discussed today. It’s probably because Heath Ledger’s Joker overshadowed him when The Dark Knight released. The Joker was excellent as well. But, Neeson’s portrayal should not be forgotten; he is easily one of the best villains of the 2000s. No version of Ra’s al Ghul has come close in quality to the one featured in Batman Begins.

Christian Bale is a good Batman, but sometimes a mediocre Bruce Wayne here. A rather odd scene is when Bruce is talking to Rachel at the hotel gathering. The dialogue, “It’s– not me. It’s… Inside, I am…I am more.” just seemed off and poorly said. As for Batman, it’s easy to forget that while serious, he does have some funny moments here. When breaking through the asylum, he tells the two inmates, “Excuse me.” In one not funny, but sweet scene, he gives his periscope to a little boy, because the other kids doesn’t believe him about Batman. All in all, Batman is an effective character in the film. I won’t lie though; him saying, “I’m Batman” was executed in a cheesy way.

scarecrow 1

 

I really enjoyed Cillian Murphy’s portrayal of Johnathan Crane/Scarecrow. The first scuffle between him and Batman was brilliantly choreographed. Later, the scene with Crane saying, “He’s here.” “The Batman.” was also well done. Overall, Christopher Nolan’s take on Batman’s rogues’ gallery has proved fascinating. In the trilogy, we had Scarecrow, Ra’s al Ghul, Joker, Two-Face, Catwoman, Talia al Ghul, and Bane. It would have been great to see more films from the director. I would have loved to see Nolan’s take on the Riddler, or Mr. Freeze. One more villainous character deserves mention in Batman Begins: Carmine Falcone. One really great scene was when Bruce confronted Falcone at the latter’s pub. Tom Wilkinson as the crime boss delivered such great dialogue; it’s almost a shame that Scarecrow put him out of commission later in the story. (Then again, Crane frightening Falcone was such a great scene.)

Alfred, James Gordon, and Lucius Fox all contribute to the story. These characters are portrayed by skillful actors. Morgan Freeman has a commanding presence as Lucius Fox, and knows how to deliver humorous remarks subtly. It’s hard to say which version of Alfred is the definitive one, but one can make the case that Michael Caine’s is. As for Rachel, she was an enjoyable character who stood up for what’s right. She had good dialogue, such as “Justice is about harmony. Revenge is about you making yourself feel better. Which is why we have an impartial system.” The scene where she held the little boy while holding a gun to inmates walking toward her was compelling. As for the soundtrack, Batman’s iconic theme comes from this film. It is powerful, and one of the best themes ever put on film. Though, one might say that the music themes are very similar to each other. I listened to the whole soundtrack as I wrote this review, and most of the music sounded the same. It’s not a terrible thing since the music is commanding. But, it should be noted that the soundtrack is not very diverse.

The action in this movie is brilliant. Every action scene is wonderfully directed. From Batman’s scuffle with Scarecrow, to the final battle in the train, this film has excellent, intense action. The climax is still one of the most thrilling in any comic book film 13 years later. Batman Begins, simply put, is a great movie. The battle against fear is a theme that is prevalent throughout the story. By the end, Bruce has fought his fear, and channeled it so he can bring hope into the streets of Gotham. Some films age well, others do not. 25 years from now, Batman Begins will still be a great watch.

arkham-knight-silhouette-5

Lucky Star Review

lucky star poster

What is the greatest sitcom of all time? That is a hard question to answer. Many would say some of these classics are: The Odd Couple, The Honeymooners, and I Love Lucy. Those are excellent choices, and it would be hard to disagree. I would throw in another popular choice to the mix. This choice is also a classic, though not retro like the others. The answer of course, is Seinfeld. I bring this up because Lucky Star’s humor often reminded me of Seinfeld.

Lucky Star is based on the 4-koma manga of the same name. Every episode features something new, and there are usually multiple segments in a single episode. In short, this series is the definition of an episodic format. The characters include Konata –  a manga/video game obsessed fan, Kagami – a tough, yet kind person who does well in school, Tsukasa – Kagami’s younger, timid sister, and Miyuki – a super intelligent, slightly introverted person, who doesn’t like going to the dentist. Other characters show up as well, and usually make the show all the more fun.

There are three core things that make Lucky Star so memorable. One of course, as already mentioned, is the humor. Konata is by far the most entertaining character, and easily one of the best characters in anime history. In one episode, Konata questions official statistics that state children are reading less. She mentions that with internet, shouldn’t children be reading more? After all, doesn’t reading blog posts count as reading? It’s this kind of ironic humor you don’t hear all too often that makes Lucky Star almost always engaging.

The second thing that makes Lucky Star great is the relationship between friends. The four main characters are true friends, and it shows. Lucky Star typically doesn’t have “emotional” sequences, but the ones that are there are really well done. Konata and Kagami always have their squabbles, but it’s all in good fun, and the viewer knows these two in particular are the best of friends. In one scene, the girls are at a concert. Unfortunately, Konata is on the shorter side, so she has trouble seeing the singer. Kagami takes notice, and switches her spot with Konata so the latter can get the full experience of the concert. It’s a subtle, but sweet scene.

lucky star 1

The third thing that makes this show so much fun is the constant anime and Japanese pop culture references. Of course, only fans like Konata would get some of these. In one episode, the girls are visiting Kyoto, and Konata says, “So Iris went inside here…” This is referring to the science fiction epic, Gamera III: The Revenge of Iris. In that film, the antagonist monster battled Gamera at Kyoto. The girls have no idea what Konata is talking about, but fans do. (I’m sure many of us could relate to Konata!)

The show is close to getting a perfect score, but is held back slightly. There are a few weak episodes, beginning with “Fixtures of Summer.” These episodes weren’t bad, but lacked the quality writing other episodes had. But, the show bounced back, delivering consistently quality stories after these weaker episodes. While most of the characters are good, Konata’s dad was questionable. His character quirk quickly became annoying.

There are some plot points that are mentioned, but not further touched upon. In one episode, Konata’s dad says he may plan to get married again. That is never followed up on. In another episode, the girls talk to Miyuki about going to the latter’s house. But, that conversation didn’t actually lead to them going there.Lucky Star gif 1

With all that said, any negatives in Lucky Star are offset by its many positives. The show is a success in the episodic format. It showcases genuine friendship. The final episode, where the girls perform the show’s theme song, was such a great way to close the story. Everything just comes together nicely. Also, the Akira Kogami ‘Lucky Channel’ segments at the end of each episode were fun. Simply put, Lucky Star is great. Every anime fan should watch it.

9/10